Bestiary

Bestiary

A compendium of variant monsters found in Midhgardhur:

  • Bergrisi (plural bergrisar) – “hill-giant” – roughly the same as the hill giants found in Pathfinder.
  • Draugur (plural draugar) – a name for any corporeal undead (not just the “draugr” found in the Bestiary 2 !)
  • Einfaetingur (plural einfaetingar) – “uniped,” “one-foot,” a type of humanoid creature with only a single leg and foot, in Northern mythology.
  • Fylgja (plural fylgjur) – “Fetch” – When encountered as a monster, this corresponds to the monster “Eidolon, Unfettered” pp. 110-111 of Bestiary 3. Also, dopplegangers call themselves fylgjur or fylgjur-folk, claiming to be the “spirit doubles” of people they intend to kill and replace.
  • Gradvergur (plural gradvergar) – “Gray Dwarves” – Essentially identical to standard Pathfinder duergar, these are descendants of dwarves who abandoned their allies among the Aesir to join forces with the Jotnar. This has led to some truly unusual alliances, including pacts between the gradvergar and the svartalfar . . . Gradvergar
  • Gygur (plural gygjur) – a type of evil giantess or ogress (exclusively a female name).
  • Haug-bui – “Mound-dweller” – The Northern name for a type of corporeal undead that inhabits a haugur, or burial mound – usually a wight or something similar.
  • Hjasi (plural hjasar) – A monstrous, dog-like creature, with ears so long they touch the ground. It is said they live incredibly long lives, so that “as old as the hjasi” is a proverb.
  • Hrimthurs (plural hrimthursir) – “Rime-thurs,” or “frost-giant” – another name for the frost giants found in standard Pathfinder.
  • Jarnvidhja (plural jarnvidhjur) – A type of evil giantess (the term is exclusively female) that dwell in the Eastern forests known as the Jarnvidhur (Ironwood).
  • Kyrkogrim – “Church Grim” – originally the spirit of the first person buried in a new temple’s graveyard, later the spirit of an animal specifically sacrificed to spare a human soul from the associated duty of watching over the temple and its worshipers.
  • Ljosmadhur (plural ljosmenn) – Another name for a will-o-wisp. Also called an “irrbloss” in common parlance. Many believe that the ljosmadhur hovers by night over places where treasure has been concealed.
  • Lokabrenna or Lokadaun – “Loki’s torch” or “Loki’s fire” – a will-o-wisp.
  • Mara – Similar to the night hag of the standard Pathfinder game.
  • Niflungur (plural Niflungar) – A type of huldrufolk, similar to the svirfneblin of the standard Pathfinder setting. They have a close affinity with dvergar (dwarves).
  • Nykur (plural nykar) – a type of water-spirit, essentially similar to a nymph or rusalka, though they are male as often as female. Many Northern traditions mention such beings – that they are fond of singing and dancing, that they foretell the future, that they bring forth rain or storms, that they come to the aid of women in labor, that their presence at weddings brings prosperity to the bride. Some are said to guard renovating springs (Jungbrunnen) which restore the old to youth, or springs with other mystic properties . . .
  • Pyslingur (plural pyslingar) – The undead spirits of murdered children who seek vengeance upon the living.
  • Skergipur (plural skergipar) – A type of giant bird, similar to a roc.
  • Skoffin – A mythological creature of uncertain description – sometimes used as an alternate name for a skuggabaldur, at other times a type of bird that breathes fire and has a petrifying gaze, which can only be harmed with holy and/or silver weapons.
  • Skuggabaldur (plural skuggabaldar) – In folk belief, the offspring of a tomcat (male cat) and vixen (female fox), or possibly a bitch (female dog). Also used as a term for an evil spirit or a sneaky person who commits evil deeds anonymously.
  • Strandvarsel – “Shore Apparition” – a spirit that haunts a seashore, warning of ill omens.
  • Svanmeyja (plural svanmeyjar) – “Swan Maiden,” or “Swanmay” – A spirit maiden similar to a fey version of a valkyrja. She bears a cloak of feathers called an alftarham which allows her to transform into a swan.
  • Svartalfur (plural svartalfar) – “Dark Elf” – roughly equivalent to a standard Pathfinder drow in description and statistics, but with a different culture and cosmology (they are not matriarchal and do not worship a spider-goddess, although they are linked to spiders and other vermin from under the earth, where they dwell in darkness). Svartalfar
  • Thurs (plural thursir) – A type of ogre or giant, related to the jotnar.
  • Troll – A catch-all term in the North for humanoid monsters which include goblinoids, orcs, and more standard trolls from the various bestiaries
  • Trollfolk – Used to refer to the goblinoid races of standard Pathfinder. The lesser trollfolk are roughly equivalent to goblins, the trollfolk are roughly equivalent to hobgoblins, and greater trollfolk are roughly equivalent to bugbears. The term “Orcnar” refers to beings roughly equivalent to standard orcs. The main difference between the standard Pathfinder races and those in Midhgardhur is that the Midhgardhur troll races were created by primal elemental forces, carved from rock, ice, magma, and such, and given a foul sort of life, in mockery of the vaettir created by the gods. As such, they are believed to be soul-less, having life only by the will of the primal Jotnar.
  • Trollkyn – A halfbreed race, usually half human and half “troll,” roughly corresponding to standard Pathfinder half-orcs, but with a much greater propensity for sorcery. As half their life comes from the elemental force of the Jotnar, they have great affinity with sorcery. Most of the trollkyn are the offspring of orcnar trolls (equivalent of standard Pathfinder orcs). However, since they also descend from genuine living beings, the vaettir (particularly humans), they have souls and are truly alive.
  • Vaettur (plural vaettir) – “wight” – A living creature, technically including human beings, but often used to refer instead to the “other” races of wights, also known as landvaettir (“land-wights,” “beings of the land”): alfar (elves), dvergar (dwarves), huldrufolk (gnomes), and lytlingar (halflings), and even trollkyn (being born of the vaettir and trolls), among others.
  • Vanakyn (“Kin of the Vanir”) – a term used in the Midhgardhur setting for standard Pathfinder game “fey.”

Summoning

If one summons a creature to Midhgardhur from elsewhere, its home world depends on its nature:

Bestiary

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